House Rules

Languages

Lang

The Spoken Word

The common language in Embyr is Talian. PCs are all fluent in Talian, though this may not be the case with all NPCs.

Human PCs who are not descended from Talian stock are also fluent in their own native tongues as detailed in The Bloodlines of Humanity.

Human PCs who are Talian may also speak the more archaic High Talian, the elegant and time-honored traditional speech of playwrights and emperors.

Demihuman PCs may add any single bonus language they wish to their list of Known Languages which may or may not be one from the above mentioned Bloodlines of Humanity.

The Written Word

While a character may speak a number of languages he might only be literate in one. Though perfectly capable of phonically scribing a familiar language in his own alphabet, attempting to read a language in an alien text will always result in failure even if the PC is fluent in that language in spoken form. The exception to this is when a class feature or skill allows a character to decipher an otherwise unknown script.

Sea Travel

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Note: These rules are intended for players who take a hand in sailing the seas themselves. Chartered ships run by able NPC crews and the circumstances of their respective voyages should be left to the DM and the needs of the adventure.

Ships and the Main Game Map

NAVIGATION
To navigate a vessel from a port of call to the nav point of the nearest dodec, or to navigate from the nav point of one dodec to another requires a DC 15 from the captain. If the captain has the Background: Sailor he may add his proficiency modifier to this roll. If even 1 able shipmate who also has the Background: Sailor assists the captain, he may make this roll with advantage.

TIME ON THE WATER
The standard amount of time it takes for a vessel to reach any given nav point is 24+2d12 hours.

If the nearest nav point to a port of call is within a landmass the ship must skirt the coastline until it enters a hex that is adjacent to a new dodec with an oceanborn nav point. Each hex thus traveled requires a DC 15 from the captain and 24+2d12 hours. Again, if even 1 able shipmate who also has the Background: Sailor assists the captain, he may make this roll with advantage.

Example: The charted course on the map below will take a vessel from the port of Byrnaer in Shailia to the port of Sunia in Talia. Hexes and point paths marked in yellow denote a DC of 15 and 24+2d12 hours of travel, as do the paths of the open ocean marked in blue. If all goes well this journey will last 10 to 12 days on the average, but could conceivably last as long as 16 days (or longer. See: The Captain Fails below) if the sea gods are unkind.

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CREW
The ship must have an able crew, meaning the minimum complement necessary to man her stations. Some vessels require only a single operator, while larger, more complex ships necessitate a host of sailors.

5 or 6 out of 6 Sailors (all hands on deck!)= DC 15 (standard)
4 out of 6 Sailors (we’ve suffered losses!)=DC 17
3 out of 6 Sailors (skeleton crew, captain!)=DC 19
2 out of 6 Sailors (she’s listing, captain!)=DC 21
1 out of 6 Sailors (we’re taking on water!)=DC 23
Less then 1 of 6 Sailors (abandon ship!)=DC 25

Example: A vessel that normally requires 12 sailors to main her stations with a crew of 9 mandates a DC 17 from her captain to reach the next charted nav point.

Wind and Weather

There are 3 separate d20 rolls to make to establish the starting travel conditions at the beginning of the voyage; one for the wind, one for the temperature, and one for the weather.

Roll 1d20 to determine the wind conditions. The terms ‘favorable’ vs ‘unfavorable’ are meant to quantify both the strength and direction of the prevailing wind.

1= Becalmed. No movement today unless you have oars.
2-6= Slight, unfavorable winds. Add 3d12 to travel time.
7-11= favorable winds. Stay the course and all is well.
12-19= Strong, unfavorable winds. Captain has disadvantage
20= Squall. DC +5 and captain has disadvantage

Now roll 1d20 to determine the temperature. Where you are in the world has more to do with the actual temperature than the dice. For instance, a ‘Coldsnap’ off of the northern coast of Chula in the summertime would be in the mid 40’s.

By and large the temperature will have little to no impact on the journey unless it is so cold there is a danger of ice, or so warm it threatens the health of the crew.

1= Coldsnap.
2-6= Unseasonably cold.
7-11= What you would expect this time of year.
12-19= Unseasonably warm.
20= Heatwave.

Finaly, roll 1d20 to determine the weather conditions.

1= Bonedry
2-6= Slight mist.
7-11= Occasional precipitation.
12-19= Heavy precipitation. Captain has disadvantage
20= Torential precipitation. DC +5 and captain has disadvantage

Once the baseline for the weather is set, roll 1d6 for each of the three categories every 24 hours (no score may be shifted to less than 1 or more than 20).

1= shift the d20 score downward on the scale 2 points
2= shift the d20 score downward on the scale 1 point
3-4= no change
5= shift the d20 score upward on the scale 1 point
6= shift the d20 score upward on the scale 2 points

The Captain Excels

If the captain exceeds the DC by 1 or more, he may roll 1d4 and deduct the result from the standard time it would have otherwise taken to clear a charted hex or reach the nav point of the next charted dodec. If the captain exceeds the DC by 3 or more, he may roll 2d4 and so on up to the maximum of 6d4.

The Captain Fails

If the captain fails to meet or exceed the DC, add 2d12 hours to the standard time it would have otherwise taken to clear a charted hex or reach the nav point of the next charted dodec.

If the captain rolls a natural “1” there will be a maritime mishap of some sort; the ship may take on water or become damaged, or there could be a problem with the crew. In any event, add 3d12 hours to the standard time it would have otherwise taken to clear a charted hex or reach the nav point of the next charted dodec.

The Captain Fails Three Times in a Row

If the captain fails on three consecutive attempts, the ship will be blown off course or run aground.

Ship is Off Course. If the vessel is to enter the open sea (blue line travel) it is blown off course. To find the vessel’s new location start with the nav point of the intended charted dodec and roll 1d12. Follow that zig-zag path (no straight lines of travel allowed) for 1+1d4 points and you will have the ship’s actual location (stupid luck may work in the player’s favor, with the ship being on course and leagues ahead of schedule, and the dumbfounded captain saying, “Uh… I meant to do that!”) . If this location is a land mass then the ship is considered to be in the shallows off of the coast. The captain may now try to navigate to the nearest nav point or hex and continue the voyage as per usual.

Ship has Run Aground. If the vessel’s charted course was to enter the shallows off the coast (yellow hex travel) it will run aground. The ship must stay where it is to free itself and/or affect repairs for 1d4 days. Once this time elapses the captain may try to navigate to the nearest nav point or hex and continue the voyage as per usual.

The Captain Catastrophically Fails

If the captain rolls a natural “1” on what would be a third consecutive failed attempt, there will be a maritime disaster of some sort. The ship could become beached or damaged to the point of sinking, or there could be a mutiny on deck. Certainly something that will trigger an adventure!

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Drinking Games

Drunk

Getting Drunk

How much a character can drink before he is considered drunk or passes out depends on three things; the strength of the drink, the character’s CON, and the amount the character consumes.

Alcoholic drinks will have a strength between 1 and 11 as listed below:

Grog and other watered down fare = 1
Beers and Ales = 3
Hard Ciders and Common Wines = 5
Fortified Wines and Sherrys = 7
Spirits and Cask Liquors = 9
Neutral Grain Spirits = 11

Note: The alcoholic strengths listed above assume that the volume of fluid in each example is equal to a common flagon. Most proprietors will serve a respective beverage in a container that keeps the strength of the drink between 1 and 5.

Intoxication
A Character may drink alcohol and remain unaffected until the strength of the drinks he consumes equals or exceeds his CON score. After that he is considered to be intoxicated.

If a character has a racial resistance to poisons he may treat his CON as if it were 5 points higher than its actual score (a dwarf with a CON of 16 may drink as if his CON were 21).

Inebriation
If an intoxicated character continues to drink, he must make a saving throw each time he imbibes or else he becomes inebriated.

If a character has a racial resistance to poisons he may make this saving throw with advantage.

Under the Table
If an inebriated character continues to drink, he must make a saving throw each time he again imbibes or else he is rendered unconscious.

Again, if a character has a racial resistance to poisons he may make this saving throw with advantage.

Blackout Drunk
If a character passes out as a result of becoming inebriated there is a chance that he will have no memory of events or his actions once he later regains consciousness. He must make a saving throw once he is finally up and about or else he will have no recall of the night before. He may also have a new tattoo.

Note: These rules assume that the character is at least a casual drinker. If a player has elected to define his character as a highly sober individual then that respective character should treat his CON as if it were 5 points lower than it actually is.

House Rules

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